Hadaree

Hadaree literally means “person or people of the
town,” and is used to denote both singular and plural.
Of Beduan origin, it is conferred on any human born in
a village, town or city, and applies irrespective of their
creed, heritage, and nationality. While some commonality
exists between settlements in a given geographic region,
the word does not truly describe any exact culture—in
the same way Bedu tribes have cultural differences built
around common social mores and customs, so the same
is true of the denizens of permanent settlements. In essence,
it simply means a non-nomad.
When it comes to magic, Devoted Hadaree prefer
jinn magic to all other forms, this being the magic of
Suleiman. Wizirs, while not found in large numbers,
are common in most courts and the houses of the rich
and powerful. Khem-hekau and ushabti mages are a tiny
minority among the spellcasting community. Sand magic
hasn’t been popular since before the War of Copper Jars,
and many still treat it as rather backward. The same mentality
similarly applies to dervish magic.
Faithful Hadaree have no particular bias, typically
choosing a deity who will favor their occupation. The official
state religion, however, is Shamash, and his temples
can be found at the heart of every city.
Men with money prefer silk clothing, with extremely
baggy pants being the current craze, while ladies wear
silk dresses and veils. Poorer folk make do with cotton
trousers and shirts or dresses, or simple floor-length
robes. Footwear also varies with wealth, with the poor
wearing open sandals or leather boots, and the wealthier
citizens wearing silk slippers or fancy leather shoes.
Names: Ahmed, Azhar, Badr, Farhan, Hazim, Mushtaq,
Ra’if, Zarif (male); Almas, Asiyah, Gharam, Husna,
Juman, Nadia, Sirah (female).
Hadaree do not use familial names. Instead, they typically
use the word “ibn” (“son of ”) or “bint” (“daughter
of ”), followed by the name of their father. Though it is
common among the lower classes to end here, nobles
often list several ancestors, if only to show the unbroken
line of their familial power.
A new trait is developing, however. Rather than us-
ing familial name strings, many folk have begun using
their personal name followed by “the” and a self-given
title, often relating to an occupation. Thus, one may find
Ahmed the Beggar, Farhan the Guide, or Sirah the Wise.
Some say this began long ago with a certain famous mariner,
though others argue it stems from the mighty nobles
who rule the great cities.

Hadaree

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